Brahmand NewsPrevious Article
Brahmand NewsNext Article
Headlines
  • Europe launches two more Galileo navigation satellites:-Europe has inched a step closer towards operationalising its own satellite navigation system by successfully orbiting two more satellites for the Galileo constellation....
  • Obama announces full lifting of Vietnam arms embargo:-The US has fully lifted its ban on weapons sales to Vietnam, President Barack Obama has announced during a visit to Hanoi, unpicking a decades-old embargo on the one-time enemy. ...
  • Defence Ministry looking for alternative to Finmeccanica's torpedos :-Indian Defence Ministry is now looking for an alternative for the chopper scam tainted Italian defence conglomerate Finmeccanica's heavy weight torpedos for the Scorpene submarines. The proposal to acquire 98 Black Shark torpedoes for the six under construction French Scorpene submarines for a price of Rs 1,200 crore has been nixed....
  • May take 10 years for India to have reusable rocket: Scientist:-Describing Monday's successful launch of an indigenously winged Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) as a small step in achieving the objective of reducing the cost of space transportation, top space scientist G Madhavan Nair said it may take ten years for the country to put in place such an operational rocket....
Defexpo 2016

Astronomers discover new planetary nebula

Article
Line Spacing+- AFont Size+- Print This Article

Kronberger 61 showing the ionized shell of expelled gas resembling a soccer ball. Photo by Gemini Observatory.

WASHINGTON (PTI): Astronomers claim to have discovered a new planetary nebula -- an interstellar cloud of dust, hydrogen gas, helium gas and other ionised gases.

While observing at Kitt Peak National Observatory's telescope, a team at Macquarie University confirmed that the object known as Kn 61 was a planetary nebula, as suspected.

There are roughly 3,000 planetary nebulae known in the Milky Way Galaxy and surveys continue to find more.

The team behind this discovery is hopeful that with a larger sample this information along with Kepler telescope's extraordinary precision could offer answers to some long- contested questions, such as how planetary nebulae produce their fantastic shapes.

"With a sufficient sample of planetary nebulae, Kepler could help us understand these objects and may even put to rest the 30-year-old debate about the origin of these nebulae," said Orsola De Marco, who led the team.

Professor Travis Rector from the University of Alaska, Anchorage, has captured a beautiful image of the newly confirmed planetary nebula using the 8.1-m Gemini Telescope.

Appearing as a lovely blue bubble, the picture also includes a bright star and spiral galaxy.

Tags:

Line Spacing+- AFont Size+- Print Article

Other Related News

"Hybrid" Pluto continues to puzzle scientists

The farthest and tiniest planet in the Solar System behaves less like a comet than expected and somewhat more like a planet like Mars or Venus in the way it interacts with the solar wind, scientists have found out in a new research.

Upcoming Defence Exhibitions

BRAHMOS Missile Systems

Headlines

Brahmand World Defence Update 2016

Image Gallery